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The Size of Guam Island – Everything You Need to Know

Guam, a tropical paradise in the western Pacific Ocean, is known for its stunning beaches, rich culture, and unique history. But have you ever wondered about the size and dimensions of this beautiful island?

Guam, which is located in Micronesia, is the largest and southernmost island in the Mariana Islands archipelago. With a total land area of approximately 210 square miles, Guam is relatively small compared to other islands in the region.

Measuring about 30 miles long and 8 miles wide, Guam is roughly shaped like a boomerang. Its irregular coastline stretches for approximately 125 miles, offering a variety of picturesque bays, coves, and cliffs for visitors to explore and enjoy.

Despite its small size, Guam is packed with natural beauty and offers a diverse range of landscapes, from sandy beaches and clear turquoise waters to lush jungles and rolling hills. Whether you are seeking adventure or tranquility, Guam’s compact size makes it easy to experience the island’s unique attractions and cultural treasures.

So, if you are planning a visit to Guam, be prepared to be enchanted by its small but captivating dimensions. From the moment you step foot on this enchanting island, you will be greeted by its warm hospitality and endless wonders that await you.

Overview of Guam Island

Guam is an island located in the western Pacific Ocean. It is the largest and southernmost island in the Mariana Islands archipelago.

The total area of Guam is approximately 544 square kilometers (210 square miles). The island has a length of about 48 kilometers (30 miles) and a width of approximately 14 kilometers (9 miles).

Guam is known for its beautiful sandy beaches, tropical climate, and diverse marine life. It has a rich cultural heritage and is home to the indigenous Chamorro people. The island is a popular tourist destination and is also of strategic importance to the United States as it serves as a military outpost in the Pacific region.

Location and Geographic Features

Guam is an island located in the western Pacific Ocean. It is the largest island in Micronesia and covers an area of approximately 210 square miles (540 square kilometers). The island is situated in the westernmost region of the Pacific’s Mariana Islands and is surrounded by the Philippine Sea.

Guam is characterized by its beautiful beaches, stunning coral reefs, and lush tropical vegetation. It features a diverse range of geographical features, including mountains, cliffs, and valleys. The highest point on the island is Mount Lamlam, standing at 1,332 feet (406 meters) tall.

The warm tropical climate of Guam supports a rich biodiversity, with numerous species of flora and fauna inhabiting the island. The surrounding waters are home to an abundance of marine life, making it a popular destination for snorkeling, scuba diving, and fishing.

Due to its strategic location, Guam has a unique mix of cultures and influences. It has a rich indigenous Chamorro heritage, as well as strong influences from Spanish, American, and Asian cultures. This diversity is reflected in the island’s cuisine, language, and traditions.

Size and Dimensions

The area of Guam Island is approximately 210 square miles (549 square kilometers). It is the largest and southernmost island in the Mariana archipelago.

The dimensions of the island are approximately 30 miles (48 kilometers) long and 9 miles (14 kilometers) wide. The coastline spans about 125 miles (201 kilometers) and is surrounded by coral reefs.

Topographical Features

Guam Island is characterized by rolling hills, lush vegetation, and sandy beaches. It is mountainous in the north, with Mount Lamlam being the highest point on the island at 1,334 feet (407 meters) above sea level.

The island’s terrain also includes valleys, plains, and cliffs, providing diverse landscapes for visitors to explore.

Pacific Ocean Location

Situated in the western Pacific Ocean, Guam Island is located approximately 900 miles (1,450 kilometers) east of the Philippines. It is an unincorporated territory of the United States and serves as an important strategic military outpost.

The island’s size and dimensions make it an ideal destination for outdoor activities such as hiking, snorkeling, and beachcombing.

Land Area and Terrain

The island of Guam, located in the western Pacific Ocean, has a total land area of approximately 541 square kilometers (209 square miles). The dimensions of Guam are roughly 48 kilometers (30 miles) in length and 18 kilometers (11 miles) in width. It is the largest and southernmost of the Mariana Islands.

With its diverse terrain, Guam offers a variety of landscapes for visitors to explore. The island features beautiful sandy beaches, lush jungles, and rugged cliffs. The central part of Guam is covered with dense tropical rainforest, while the southern region is characterized by rolling hills and valleys. The northern part of the island is known for its limestone cliffs and stunning coastal views.

In addition to its natural beauty, Guam also has several mountains and hills. The highest peak on the island is Mount Lamlam, standing at approximately 406 meters (1,332 feet) above sea level. Other notable mountains include Mount Jumullong Manglo and Mount Lamotrek. These elevated areas provide breathtaking panoramic views of the island and are popular destinations for hiking and outdoor activities.

Terrain Area
Tropical rainforest Central Guam
Sandy beaches Coastal areas
Rolling hills and valleys Southern Guam
Limestone cliffs Northern Guam

In conclusion, Guam is a diverse and beautiful island with a total land area of approximately 541 square kilometers (209 square miles). Its dimensions of roughly 48 kilometers (30 miles) in length and 18 kilometers (11 miles) in width make it the largest and southernmost of the Mariana Islands.

Coastline and Beaches

Guam, with its size and dimensions, offers a magnificent coastline and stunning beaches for visitors to enjoy. With a total area of 210 square miles, Guam boasts an impressive coastline that stretches for approximately 125 miles. This extensive coastline provides a plethora of opportunities for beach enthusiasts to soak up the sun, swim in the crystal-clear waters, and indulge in various water activities.

The island’s beaches showcase white sandy shores, azure waters, and breathtaking views. One of the most famous beaches on Guam is Tumon Bay, known for its vibrant nightlife, luxurious resorts, and vibrant coral reefs. Tumon Bay’s powdery white sand is perfect for sunbathing and beach games, while its calm waters are ideal for swimming and snorkeling.

Another stunning beach is Ritidian Point, located at the northernmost tip of the island. This secluded beach offers a serene escape from the hustle and bustle of the main tourist areas. With its pristine white sand, turquoise waters, and lush greenery, Ritidian Point provides a tranquil setting for relaxation and gentle beach strolls.

Whether you’re looking for a lively beach experience or a secluded paradise, Guam’s coastline offers a diverse range of options. From popular tourist hotspots to hidden gems, the island’s beaches are sure to captivate and enchant visitors from around the world.

Climate and Weather

Guam, with its small dimensions, is an island located in the western Pacific Ocean. The climate of Guam can be described as tropical marine, as it experiences warm temperatures year-round.

Temperatures

The average temperature in Guam ranges between 75°F (24°C) and 85°F (29°C) throughout the year. However, the humidity levels can make it feel hotter than it actually is. The warmest months are typically from May to October, while the coolest months are from December to March.

Rainfall

Guam has a wet season from July to December and a dry season from January to June. The island receives an average annual rainfall of around 100 inches (250 cm). The rain showers are usually short and intense, and typhoons can occur between June and December, bringing heavy rainfall and strong winds.

Overall, Guam’s climate offers a tropical and humid environment, making it a popular destination for those seeking warm weather and beautiful beaches.

Dimensions of Guam Island

The island of Guam is located in the western Pacific Ocean and is one of the 17 territories of the United States. With a total area of approximately 210 square miles (540 square kilometers), Guam is the largest and southernmost island in the Mariana Islands archipelago.

Guam measures about 30 miles (48 kilometers) in length and varies in width from 4 to 12 miles (6 to 19 kilometers). The coastline of Guam stretches for approximately 120 miles (193 kilometers) and is known for its beautiful beaches and coral reefs.

Guam’s size and geographic location make it an important military hub in the Pacific region. The island is home to several military bases, including Andersen Air Force Base and Naval Base Guam.

Despite its relatively small size, Guam is known for its diverse landscape, which includes mountains, cliffs, and rolling hills. The highest point on the island is Mount Lamlam, standing at 1,332 feet (406 meters) above sea level.

Overall, Guam’s size and natural beauty make it a popular destination for tourists and outdoor enthusiasts who enjoy activities such as hiking, snorkeling, and exploring the island’s unique cultural heritage.

Length and Width

When considering the size of Guam, it is important to take into account its length and width. Guam is an island located in the western Pacific Ocean, and its unique shape contributes to its overall area.

Length

The length of Guam extends approximately 32 miles from north to south. This measurement includes the northernmost point of the island, Ritidian Point, to the southernmost point, Cocos Island. The elongated shape of Guam contributes to its diverse topography and allows for a variety of different ecosystems to thrive.

Width

The width of Guam varies throughout the island, but on average, it spans around 8 miles from east to west. This measurement is taken from the easternmost point of Guam, Point Udall, to the westernmost point, Orote Peninsula. The varying width of the island creates distinct regions with different landscapes and natural features.

Overall, the length and width of Guam contribute to its total area, which is approximately 212 square miles. This relatively small size allows for close-knit communities and easy access to beaches, forests, and other natural attractions.

Area and Square Miles

Guam is the largest and southernmost island in the Mariana Islands archipelago. It is located in the western Pacific Ocean and covers an area of approximately 210 square miles. The island has dimensions of approximately 30 miles in length and 9 miles in width.

With its unique geographical location, Guam boasts stunning natural beauty and diverse ecosystems. The island is known for its tropical rainforests, sandy beaches, and vibrant coral reefs.

The small size of Guam makes it easy to explore and navigate. Despite its relatively small land area, the island offers a wide range of activities and attractions for visitors to enjoy. From hiking to water sports, there is something for everyone on this fascinating island.

Feature Measurement
Area Approximately 210 square miles
Length Approximately 30 miles
Width Approximately 9 miles

Elevation and Highest Point

Guam, the largest and southernmost island in the Marianas, has various elevations across its terrain. The island’s highest point is Mount Lamlam, towering at an elevation of 1,332 feet (406 meters) above sea level. This majestic peak offers breathtaking panoramic views of the island and the surrounding Pacific Ocean.

The diverse topography of Guam includes hills, valleys, and coastal plains. The island’s rugged landscape is a result of volcanic activity in the past. Due to its geological history, Guam showcases a combination of volcanic peaks and limestone cliffs, creating a unique tropical scenery that attracts visitors from around the world.

Elevation Variations

The elevation of Guam’s inland areas varies significantly from its coastal regions. The interior of the island features higher elevations, with lush forests and scenic vistas. As you move towards the coastline, the terrain gradually transitions to lower elevations, offering sandy beaches and stunning ocean views.

Impacts of Elevation

The elevation of Guam’s landmass affects its climate, vegetation, and overall biodiversity. Higher elevations experience lower temperatures and higher rainfall, supporting lush vegetation and diverse wildlife. Coastal areas, on the other hand, have a more arid climate and support different types of plant and animal species.

Exploring the various elevations on Guam provides a unique opportunity to witness the island’s natural beauty and understand its ecological diversity. Whether hiking up Mount Lamlam or strolling along the picturesque coastal plains, visitors can experience the captivating dimensions of Guam’s landscape and appreciate its rich ecological heritage.

Surrounding Waters and Seas

Located in the western Pacific Ocean, Guam is an island with dimensions that make it an interesting feature on the ocean’s surface. The island is surrounded by various bodies of water, contributing to its unique geographical position.

Firstly, Guam is located in the western Pacific Ocean, specifically in the region known as Micronesia. It is situated between the Philippine Sea and the Pacific Ocean, making it a strategic location for both military and commercial purposes. The island is part of the Marianas Archipelago, which includes several other small islands.

The Philippine Sea, located to the west of Guam, is an area of the western Pacific Ocean characterized by its deep depths and diverse marine life. It is known for its abundance of coral reefs and is a popular destination for diving and snorkeling enthusiasts. The sea is also home to various species of fish, making it an important resource for the local fishing industry.

To the east of Guam lies the expanse of the Pacific Ocean, the largest and deepest ocean on Earth. The Pacific Ocean is known for its vastness, covering more than 63 million square miles. It is also home to various islands and archipelagos, including Hawaii, the Galapagos Islands, and many others.

Conclusion

The waters surrounding Guam, including the Philippine Sea and the Pacific Ocean, contribute to the island’s unique geography. They provide opportunities for various water activities and support local industries, such as fishing and tourism. Guam’s size and location make it an essential part of the western Pacific Ocean ecosystem.

Size of Guam Island

The area of Guam island is approximately 210 square miles (544 square kilometers).

Located in the western Pacific Ocean, Guam is the largest and southernmost island of the Mariana Islands. The size of the island makes it the 32nd largest island in the United States and the 166th largest island in the world.

Known for its beautiful beaches and rich marine life, Guam is a popular destination for tourists. The island is also home to diverse flora and fauna, making it a paradise for nature lovers.

In addition to its natural beauty, Guam has a rich history and cultural heritage. The indigenous Chamorro people have inhabited the island for thousands of years, and their customs and traditions continue to be an important part of Guamanian culture.

The geography of Guam

Guam is a volcanic island, with its highest point being Mount Lamlam, which stands at 1,332 feet (406 meters) above sea level. The island is surrounded by coral reefs and has a tropical climate, with high temperatures and humidity throughout the year.

The size of Guam compared to other islands

Compared to other islands in the Pacific and around the world, Guam is relatively small in size. However, its strategic location in the western Pacific has made it an important military outpost for the United States.

Overall, the size of Guam island may be small, but its natural beauty, cultural heritage, and strategic importance make it a significant part of the Pacific region.

Comparisons to Other Islands

When considering the size of Guam Island, it can be helpful to compare its area to that of other islands around the world. Guam has a total land area of approximately 549 square kilometers (212 square miles).

One island that is often compared to Guam is Oahu, the third-largest of the Hawaiian Islands. Oahu has a land area of about 1,545 square kilometers (596 square miles), making it almost three times larger than Guam.

In terms of dimensions, Guam is approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) long and 14 kilometers (9 miles) wide. This gives it a total coastline of around 125 kilometers (78 miles).

Another well-known island that Guam is often compared to is Singapore, a city-state located in Southeast Asia. Singapore has a land area of about 719.1 square kilometers (277.6 square miles), making it slightly larger than Guam.

It’s important to note that while these comparisons provide some perspective on the size of Guam Island, each island has its unique features and characteristics that make it special in its own way.

Island Land Area (square kilometers) Land Area (square miles)
Guam 549 212
Oahu 1,545 596
Singapore 719.1 277.6

Population Density

The population density of Guam, an island situated in the Pacific Ocean, is relatively high given its small dimensions. As of the most recent estimates, the island has a population density of approximately 313 people per square kilometer.

Despite being a relatively small island, Guam is densely populated due to its strategic location and status as an unincorporated territory of the United States. The island serves as a major military base and also attracts a significant number of tourists throughout the year.

The population density of Guam has increased significantly over the years, with a steady growth rate. This can be attributed to factors such as immigration, natural population growth, and a high birth rate. The island has a diverse population, comprising various ethnicities including Chamorro, Filipino, and various other Pacific Islander groups.

With its small size and high population density, Guam faces certain challenges in terms of infrastructure, healthcare, and urban planning. Efforts are being made to address these challenges and ensure sustainable development on the island.

Land Use and Development

The land use and development of Guam Island varies due to its unique dimensions and geographical location. The island covers a total area of approximately 210 square miles, making it the largest and southernmost island of the Mariana Islands archipelago. Guam is located in the western Pacific Ocean and is surrounded by the Philippine Sea.

Due to its strategic location, Guam has played a significant role in military operations and defense throughout history. As a result, a substantial portion of the island is dedicated to military bases and installations. These areas are essential for maintaining national security and providing support for military operations in the region.

In addition to military land use, Guam also boasts lush forests, mountains, and rivers. The island is known for its diverse ecosystem, which is protected by several nature reserves and conservation areas. These natural spaces offer opportunities for recreational activities such as hiking, bird watching, and wildlife exploration.

Guam’s economy is primarily driven by tourism, with many hotels, resorts, and entertainment facilities spread across the island. These areas account for a significant portion of the land use, as they cater to the needs of tourists visiting the island. The beaches and coastal areas of Guam are popular among tourists for their crystal-clear waters and beautiful coral reefs.

As the population of Guam continues to grow, urban development has also increased. The island’s urban areas are characterized by commercial centers, residential neighborhoods, and infrastructure such as roads and utilities. Efforts are being made to balance development with the preservation of natural resources and cultural heritage.

Overall, the land use and development of Guam Island reflect its unique dimensions and the various factors that influence its growth. From military operations to tourism and urbanization, Guam showcases a diverse range of land use that contributes to its overall identity as a Pacific island.

Area of Guam Island

The dimensions and size of Guam Island make it a unique and fascinating destination. Situated in the western Pacific Ocean, Guam is the largest island of the Mariana Islands archipelago. With a total area of approximately 210 square miles, Guam is often referred to as a “micronation” due to its limited size.

Despite its small size, Guam boasts an array of natural wonders, including pristine beaches, lush forests, and stunning cliffs. The island’s diverse terrain offers opportunities for hiking, snorkeling, and exploring its rich biodiversity. Additionally, Guam is known for its vibrant culture and warm hospitality, making it a popular destination for tourists from around the world.

Geographical Features

Guam Island is characterized by its volcanic origins, featuring rugged mountains and rolling hills. The highest point on the island is Mount Lamlam, which stands at an impressive 1,334 feet above sea level. The coastline of Guam stretches for approximately 125 miles and is home to numerous sandy beaches and secluded coves.

Political Division

Administratively, Guam is an unincorporated territory of the United States. It is governed by an elected governor and a non-voting delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives. While Guam is considered a part of the United States, it maintains a unique cultural identity influenced by its indigenous Chamorro population as well as the diverse communities of immigrants who have made the island their home.

Protected Areas and Parks

Guam, an island located in the western Pacific Ocean, is known for its stunning natural beauty and diverse ecosystems. The island’s protected areas and parks play a crucial role in preserving its unique and fragile environment.

One of the key protected areas on the island is the War in the Pacific National Historical Park. Spanning over 2,000 acres, this park commemorates the events that took place on Guam during World War II. Visitors can explore various historical sites, such as the Asan Bay Overlook and the T. Stell Newman Visitor Center, and learn about the island’s role in the war.

Another notable protected area is the Ritidian Point Wildlife Refuge. Covering approximately 1,000 acres and encompassing both terrestrial and marine habitats, this refuge is home to a wide range of plant and animal species. Visitors can enjoy hiking trails, birdwatching, and snorkeling, and may even catch a glimpse of endangered species such as the Mariana fruit bat and the Guam rail.

Diminishing Size and Challenges

Despite the efforts to protect these areas, Guam’s size and dimensions pose challenges to conservation. With a total land area of approximately 209 square miles, Guam is a relatively small island. This limited space puts pressure on the existing protected areas and parks, as urban development and other human activities continue to encroach upon these natural habitats.

The small size of Guam also means that the island’s ecosystems are more vulnerable to external threats, such as invasive species and climate change. Invasive species, such as the brown tree snake, have had a devastating impact on Guam’s native wildlife, leading to the extinction of several bird species. Climate change further exacerbates these challenges, with rising sea levels and increased temperatures affecting the island’s coastal and marine ecosystems.

Promoting Conservation

Despite the challenges, efforts are underway to promote conservation on the island. The Guam Department of Agriculture’s Division of Aquatic and Wildlife Resources, in collaboration with various local and international organizations, is actively working towards preserving Guam’s natural heritage. This includes initiatives to control and mitigate invasive species, restore and protect habitats, and raise awareness about the importance of conservation.

By taking measures to protect and preserve Guam’s protected areas and parks, we can ensure the long-term sustainability of the island’s ecosystems and safeguard its unique biodiversity for future generations.

Administrative Divisions

Guam is an organized, unincorporated territory of the United States located in the western Pacific Ocean. The island is divided into 19 municipalities, which are further divided into villages.

The municipalities of Guam are:

Municipality Area (square miles)
Agana Heights 2.77
Agat 27.57
Asan-Maina 20.18
Barrigada 8.09
Chalan Pago-Ordot 9.56
Dededo 30.64
Hagåtña 1.3
Inarajan 29.61
Jonestown 8.6
Mangilao 26.9
Merizo 7.09
Mongmong-Toto-Maite 3.6
Piti 16.94
San Jose 7.12
Santa Rita 24.46
Sinan 9.54
Talofofo 16.77
Tamuning 7.65
Umatac 12.47
Yigo 52.67
Yona 21.47

These administrative divisions ensure effective governance and provision of services throughout the island of Guam.

Key Cities and Towns

Guam is a small island territory located in the western Pacific Ocean. Despite its small size and dimensions, Guam is home to several key cities and towns that contribute to its vibrant culture and economy.

Hagåtña

Hagåtña, also known as Agana, is the capital city of Guam. Located on the western coast of the island, Hagåtña is the political and administrative center of Guam. It is home to several government offices, including the Guam Legislature and the Governor’s Office. Hagåtña also features historic sites such as Fort Santa Agueda and Plaza de España.

Dededo

Dededo is the largest village in Guam and is located in the northern part of the island. With a population of over 45,000 residents, Dededo is a bustling suburban area that offers a variety of amenities and services. The Micronesia Mall, one of Guam’s largest shopping centers, is located in Dededo. The village is also home to the Guam National Wildlife Refuge and Ritidian Point, a popular beach and recreation area.

Tamuning

Tamuning is a vibrant commercial center located in the central part of Guam. It is known for its numerous hotels, shopping centers, and restaurants, making it a popular destination for tourists. Tamuning is also home to Guam’s international airport, the A.B. Won Pat International Airport, making it a hub for transportation on the island. Visitors can explore attractions such as Ypao Beach Park and the Guam Premier Outlets while in Tamuning.

Other Cities and Towns

In addition to the key cities mentioned above, Guam is also home to several other smaller towns and villages. These include, but are not limited to, Barrigada, Yigo, Piti, and Mangilao. Each town has its own unique character and attractions, ranging from beaches and parks to historical landmarks and cultural sites.

Despite its small geographical area, Guam offers a diverse range of cities and towns that showcase the island’s rich history, natural beauty, and modern amenities.

Questions and answers,

What is the size of Guam island?

The total area of Guam island is approximately 210 square miles.

What are the dimensions of Guam island?

Guam island measures about 30 miles in length and around 9 miles in width.

How big is Guam island?

Guam island has a total area of approximately 210 square miles.

What is the area of Guam island?

The area of Guam island is approximately 210 square miles.

Can you tell me the size of Guam island?

Guam island is about 210 square miles in total area.

What is the size of Guam Island?

The size of Guam Island is approximately 212 square miles.

What are the dimensions of Guam Island?

Guam Island measures approximately 30 miles long and 9 miles wide.

What is the area of Guam Island?

The total area of Guam Island is around 212 square miles.